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Indian Journal of Anesthesia and Analgesia

Volume  5, Issue 12, December 2018, Pages 1983-1987

 

Original Article

C-MAC Video Laryngoscope versus Macintosh Laryngoscope for Intubation in Elective Surgery: A Clinical Trial
Archana K.N.1, Amal Gopi2, Vyshnavi S.3
1Professor 2Junior Resident 3Assistant Professor, Department of Anaesthesia and Critical Care, JSS Medical College and Hospital, Mysore, Karnataka 570015, India.
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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.21088/ijaa.2349.8471.51218.3

Abstract

  Background: CMAC is a video laryngoscope with the unique advantage of having a blade design very similar to the most commonly used Macintosh laryngoscope. We conducted this study to compare the efficacy of intubation with the conventional Macintosh Laryngoscope and CMAC laryngoscope as measured by total time for successful intubation, number of attempts, laryngeal view, hemodynamic changes and airway morbidity. Material and Method: Seventy patients (n=35 in each group) were randomly allocated to be intubated with either CMAC or Macintosh laryngoscope (ML). Parameters measured were time taken for successful intubation, number of attempts, Cormack Lehane grading of laryngoscopic view, airway morbidity, blood pressure and heart rate at first, third and fifth minutes after Intubation. Results: The total intubation time was 26.6±3.71 seconds in CMAC group and 29.7±4.68 seconds in ML group. All the patients were intubated in first attempt. The increase in systolic blood pressure at first (121.43±9.71) and third minutes (116.60±9.53) following laryngoscopy was significantly lower in CMAC group as compared with Macintosh group (127.77±13.53 and 122.31±12.23 respectively) p=0.027 at minute 1 and p=0.021 at minute 3. Heart rate too showed a significantly lesser increase in CMAC group than in ML group (p =0.001, 0.02 and 0.009 at first, third and fifth minutes respectively). Conclusion: Intubation with CMAC is associated with shorter intubation time and better hemodynamic profile compared to conventional Macintosh laryngoscope in patients with no predicted airway difficulties. 

Keywords: Cormack Lehane Grading; Endotracheal Intubation; Video Laryngoscopes. 


Corresponding Author : Vyshnavi S., Assistant Professor, Department of Anaesthesia and Critical Care, JSS Medical College and Hospital, Mysore, Karnataka 570015, India