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RFP Journal of Hospital Administration

Volume  3, Issue 1, January-June 2019, Pages 25-27

 

Review Article

An Insight into International Health and the Overlap of Terms
Meely Panda1, Rashmi Agarwalla2, Tazean Zahoor Malik3, Vishal Kumar Singh4
1,2Assistant Professor, 3,4Resident, Dept. of Community Medicine, Hamdard Institute of Medical Sciences and Research, Jamia Hamdard, New Delhi 110062, India
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Abstract

The health of each one of us, directly and indirectly, affects others as well. International Health as we know today is because of the fact that communication and transport have become fast, instantaneous and convenient. It is very crucial to take a versatile approach to public health problems, which are often complex in nature since Health is a very vast concept and not merely a biological event. International health, in Koplan's view, has mainly focused on health issues, especially infectious diseases, and maternal and child health in low-income countries. Public health is generally is viewed as having a focus on the health of the population of a specific country or community, a perspective shared by Koplan et al. The burden of preventable disease is more concentrated in the middle- and low-income countries; most of the global health centres are located in high-income countries which adversely affects the international health. However, we are yet to explain to ourselves what exactly the term International Health means. To add to our woes, we have similar or near similar terms used in adjunction or synonymously. We suggest that academic institutions have an opportunity – as well as a responsibility – to assure that leadership for global health is as inclusive and worldwide as the tasks ahead are broad and daunting.

Keywords: International Health; Public Health; Global Health; Tropical medicine.


Corresponding Author : Meely Panda